This is my humble attempt to share useful information, present alternate ideas and inspire original thought in an effort to help people transform their approach to life, hopefully leading to a more productive, creative and stress-free existence.

The current paradigm is broken in so many ways, on so many levels and inhibits us from making the most of our lives. Relearn, rethink, reinvent. Discover the alternatives and break through the manipulation, fear and deception.

There are many ways to avoid the system, get around the system and defy the system. But there are also many ways to improve our lives by simply paying more attention and thinking through things instead of just going through the motions.

Let’s try this together. Let’s look at everything from the food we eat, to the medicine we use; the way we drive and how we use transportation; how we manage money and our understanding of what money is; how we use our time and who we spend time with; what we focus our energy and emotion on and where our potential truly lies.

I hope this will open your eyes and help you to find your own paradigm to live within.

Also find me via TS13 Creative

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https://twitter.com/TS13Creative

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17th May 2014

Photoset reblogged from Need Input! with 115,832 notes

robotindisguise:

universalequalityisinevitable:

David Suzuki in this interview about facing the reality of climate change and other environmental issues from Moyers & Company.

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the greatest weapon against our failed, broken economic system: LOGIC

Tagged: broken systemeconomyfailed economyeconomic policycapitalismcorporatismlogicwhat makes sensegreedoccupywall streetowsDavid SuzukiBill MoyersCorporate States Of America

Source: youtube.com

7th May 2014

Video with 1 note

Bill Moyers talks to Paul Krugman about Thomas Piketty’s new book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century and discusses the 1%, income inequality, consolidation of wealth, inherited wealth and the future of the United States as an oligarchy. 

Tagged: broken systemcapitalismgreedwealth gapincome inequalityconsolidated wealthinherited wealth1%occupyWall StreetOWSBill MoyersPaul KrugmanThomas Pikettycapital in the twenty-first centurybooksvideointerviewoligarchy

Source: upworthy.com

2nd May 2014

Photo

Can we end our dependence on oil already? It’s not about energy, it’s not about freedom, it’s not about security…  it’s about money and greed. THAT IS ALL! 

Can we end our dependence on oil already? It’s not about energy, it’s not about freedom, it’s not about security…  it’s about money and greed. THAT IS ALL! 

Tagged: oilbig oilenergyfossil fuelsarcticsavethearcticsave the arcticoil spillgreedbroken systempower

1st May 2014

Photo reblogged from kateoplis with 11,428 notes

kateoplis:

ilovecharts

so, basically, we’re all F’d, completely totally F’d.

kateoplis:

ilovecharts

so, basically, we’re all F’d, completely totally F’d.

Tagged: broken systemwealth gapincome inequalitydiagramchartcapitalismCorporate States Of AmericaoccupyOWSwall streetgreed

Source: medium.com

24th April 2014

Photo

Agreed! This is a broken system that needs fixin’!

Agreed! This is a broken system that needs fixin’!

Tagged: broken systemgreedCorporate States Of Americacorporatismcorporationssubsidiestax breakswealth gapoccupywall streetOWScorporate welfareprofitsexecutive pay

24th April 2014

Photoset

Is CEO pay out of control?

FUCK YES IT IS!!!

The worst part is that Sumner Redstone doesn’t provide any actual service that benefits either company, he & Rupert Murdoch are simply the last tycoons of a former age, adding to their already absurd wealth, while all of these companies struggle and continue to layoff lower level employees. 

In fact, Philippe Dauman & Sumner Redstone took a combined total compensation of $73.4 million in 2013 while Paramount Pictures, part of Viacom, let go 110 employees that same year. I wonder what percentage of their increased compensation equals the combined wages lost by those 110 employees?

Tagged: broken systemceo paywealth gapgreedtycoonsexecutive paypay scalecompensationchairmanPhilippe DaumanLes MoonvesSumner Redstone

Source: thewrap.com

16th April 2014

Photo with 4 notes

* The majority (66 percent) of low-wage workers are not employed by small businesses, but rather by large corporations with over 100 employees;
* The 50 largest employers of low-wage workers have largely recovered from the recession and most are in strong financial positions: 92 percent were profitable last year; 78 percent have been profitable for the last three years; 75 percent have higher revenues now than before the recession; 73 percent have higher cash holdings; and 63 percent have higher operating margins (a measure of profitability).
* Top executive compensation averaged $9.4 million last year at these firms, and they have returned $174.8 billion to shareholders in dividends or share buybacks over the past five years.

* The majority (66 percent) of low-wage workers are not employed by small businesses, but rather by large corporations with over 100 employees;

* The 50 largest employers of low-wage workers have largely recovered from the recession and most are in strong financial positions: 92 percent were profitable last year; 78 percent have been profitable for the last three years; 75 percent have higher revenues now than before the recession; 73 percent have higher cash holdings; and 63 percent have higher operating margins (a measure of profitability).

* Top executive compensation averaged $9.4 million last year at these firms, and they have returned $174.8 billion to shareholders in dividends or share buybacks over the past five years.

Tagged: broken systemminimum wagewealth gapgreedinfographicraise the minimum wageCorporate States Of Americacorruptionlearn somethingstand upraise uptake control

Source: raisetheminimumwage.com

15th April 2014

Video

In the U.S., it’s Tax Day. Let’s see just how fucked up this country is and how unfair the tax system is to the 99%!

Tagged: videoRobert Reichtax daytax systemunfairwealth gapincome inequalityloopholesIRSFederal Income Taxtax ratesgreedbroken system

14th April 2014

Photo reblogged from AtomicGod with 113 notes

Our “democracy” is a broken system.
GET MONEY OUT OF POLITICS!!!

Our “democracy” is a broken system.

GET MONEY OUT OF POLITICS!!!

Tagged: broken systemcorruptionend corruptioncorrupt governmentfight corruptionstand up for your rightswe the peoplebig banksoccupyowswall streetgreedCorporate States Of America

11th April 2014

Photo reblogged from kateoplis with 112 notes

kateoplis:

Matt Taibbi's The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, ”as infuriating as it is impossible to put down.”
“Taibbi wrote The Divide to demonstrate that unequal wealth is producing grotesquely unequal outcomes in criminal justice. You might say that’s an old story, but Taibbi believes that, just as income disparities are growing ever wider, so, too, are disparities in who attracts the attention of cops and prosecutors and who doesn’t. Violent crime has fallen by 44 percent in America over the past two decades, but during that same period the prison population has more than doubled, skewing heavily black and poor. In essence, poverty itself is being criminalized. Meanwhile, at the other end of the income distribution, an epidemic of white-collar crime has overtaken the financial sector, indicated, for instance, by a proliferation of record-breaking civil settlements. But partly because of an embarrassing succession of botched Justice Department prosecutions, and partly because of a growing worry (first enunciated by Attorney General Eric Holder when he was Bill Clinton’s deputy attorney general) that any aggressive prosecution of big banks could destabilize the economy, Wall Street has come, under President Obama, to enjoy near-total immunity from criminal prosecution. It had more to fear, ironically, when George W. Bush was president. …
[C]riminals are getting harder to find even as new computer systems are enabling the police commissioner to keep track of which precincts are making the most arrests. The solution turns out to be aggressive use of a stop-and-frisk policy that gives cops a blank check to “search virtually anyone at any time.” The police start behaving “like commercial fishermen, throwing nets over whole city blocks.” Some of the fish get prosecuted or ticketed for ever-pettier offenses; 20,000 summonses, for instance, are handed out annually for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk. But most fish aren’t guilty of anything and must grow accustomed to being routinely cuffed and ridden around in a police van before they are tossed back into the water. These fish are, of course, typically black and poor. Anecdotal evidence suggests that throwing a similar fishnet over entire Wall Street firms would produce a criminal yield at least as high as any random ghetto block. But innocent Wall Street fish would have a much bigger megaphone with which to proclaim their constitutional rights, and guilty Wall Street fish would have much better lawyers. …
We may be approaching a day when any kind of personal attention from a large institution that wields substantial control over your life becomes a luxury available only to the few, like a bespoke suit or designer gown.”
The Justice Gap

Matt Taibbi is one of those who reports and writes truths in the hope of sparking something in the average person who might otherwise continue to be mislead by the subjective and corrupt mainstream media here in the United States.
I, for one, am truly grateful for his tenacity and empowered by the knowledge he shares with all of us.

kateoplis:

Matt Taibbi's The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, ”as infuriating as it is impossible to put down.”

Taibbi wrote The Divide to demonstrate that unequal wealth is producing grotesquely unequal outcomes in criminal justice. You might say that’s an old story, but Taibbi believes that, just as income disparities are growing ever wider, so, too, are disparities in who attracts the attention of cops and prosecutors and who doesn’t. Violent crime has fallen by 44 percent in America over the past two decades, but during that same period the prison population has more than doubled, skewing heavily black and poor. In essence, poverty itself is being criminalized. Meanwhile, at the other end of the income distribution, an epidemic of white-collar crime has overtaken the financial sector, indicated, for instance, by a proliferation of record-breaking civil settlements. But partly because of an embarrassing succession of botched Justice Department prosecutions, and partly because of a growing worry (first enunciated by Attorney General Eric Holder when he was Bill Clinton’s deputy attorney general) that any aggressive prosecution of big banks could destabilize the economy, Wall Street has come, under President Obama, to enjoy near-total immunity from criminal prosecution. It had more to fear, ironically, when George W. Bush was president. …

[C]riminals are getting harder to find even as new computer systems are enabling the police commissioner to keep track of which precincts are making the most arrests. The solution turns out to be aggressive use of a stop-and-frisk policy that gives cops a blank check to “search virtually anyone at any time.” The police start behaving “like commercial fishermen, throwing nets over whole city blocks.” Some of the fish get prosecuted or ticketed for ever-pettier offenses; 20,000 summonses, for instance, are handed out annually for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk. But most fish aren’t guilty of anything and must grow accustomed to being routinely cuffed and ridden around in a police van before they are tossed back into the water. These fish are, of course, typically black and poor. Anecdotal evidence suggests that throwing a similar fishnet over entire Wall Street firms would produce a criminal yield at least as high as any random ghetto block. But innocent Wall Street fish would have a much bigger megaphone with which to proclaim their constitutional rights, and guilty Wall Street fish would have much better lawyers. …

We may be approaching a day when any kind of personal attention from a large institution that wields substantial control over your life becomes a luxury available only to the few, like a bespoke suit or designer gown.”

The Justice Gap

Matt Taibbi is one of those who reports and writes truths in the hope of sparking something in the average person who might otherwise continue to be mislead by the subjective and corrupt mainstream media here in the United States.

I, for one, am truly grateful for his tenacity and empowered by the knowledge he shares with all of us.

Tagged: Matt TaibbiThe DivideWealth GapAmerican injusticeinequalitybroken systemgreedcorruptionprison industrial complex